Political Science IUB

Immigration and Freedom

Immigration is frequently identified as a danger to western liberal democracies because it threatens to undermine fundamental values, most notably freedom and self-determination. Yet the greater danger is not immigration but immigration control. In reality, immigration control is not merely about controlling outsiders moving across borders. Immigration control is about controlling what outsiders do within a society. It is about controlling their freedom to work, reside, study, set up businesses, or participate in the life of domestic society. Controlling outsiders--immigrants or would-be immigrants--necessarily requires regulating, monitoring, and sanctioning insiders--citizens and residents--who would otherwise hire, house, enroll, trade with, or generally associate with outsiders. The more seriously immigration control is pursued, the more closely do citizens and residents come to be controlled and the more is freedom diminished. The search for compliance threatens freedom directly, but also weakens the values upon which it relies, notably equality and the rule of law. The alleged gains from efforts of control are illusory since they bring neither economic benefit nor social solidarity. Nor does immigration control mean self-determination since the apparatus of control is an international institutional regime that increases the power of states and their agencies at the expense of citizens. That power includes the power to determine who is and is not an insider--to define identity itself.

 

Chandran Kukathas holds the Chair of Political Theory in the Department of Government at the London School of Economics. He is the author of Hayek and Modern Liberalism (OUP 1989) and The Liberal Archipelago (OUP 2003). His next book, Immigration and Freedom, will be published by Princeton in 2019.

 

Start
Friday November 09, 2018 12:00 PM
End
Friday November 09, 2018 01:30 PM
Location
Ostrom Workshop, 513 N. Park
Contact
Allison Sturgeon
Contact Email
sturgeon@indiana.edu
Cost
Open to the public
More Contact Info
(812) 855-3151
Other Info
You are welcome to bring your lunch
Sponsoring Unit(s)
Cosponsors: Tocqueville Program and Political Theory Colloquium, Department of Political Science
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